Remote office not required ebook

 

    Editorial Reviews. Review. “The authors review the pros and cons of telecommuting, suggest Remote: Office Not Required Kindle Edition. by. “REMOTE is the book that 21st century business leaders have been waiting for” - Susan Cain, New York Times bestselling author. “profound advice from guys. Remote: office not required. [Jason Fried; David Heinemeier Hansson] -- The ' work from home' phenomenon is thoroughly explored in this.

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    Remote Office Not Required Ebook

    Basecamp founders Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson explore the " work from home" phenomenon and show precisely how a. Read "Remote Office Not Required" by Jason Fried available from Rakuten Kobo . Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. Basecamp founders Jason. [PDF] Remote: Office Not Required Kindle ready Download here: http:// unpauvagari.ga?book=

    May via photopin cc My youngest daughter works for a tech start-up based in San Francisco. She lives in Spokane Washington and arrived home for Christmas this year to spend a full three weeks hanging out with her parents. My dad still gives me a puzzling look when I quip that my office is anywhere I can get an Internet connection, but the reality is major, major businesses are being build on the backs of a remote workforce. Fried and his business partner David Heinemeier Hansson have built a wildly successful company with offices in Chicago, but workers strewn about several continents. Of course, remote work requires a shift in culture, a new set of tools and more than anything, sharp focus. Buffer , a social media start-up with a number of remote workers, posted this great advice on tools for remote work. Zapier , an API integration provider, also with a mostly remote workforce, chronicled their best practices for managing remote teams here. The office of today just might not be an office at all. I for one would be fine with that little cabin in the Colorado foothills!

    Sort order. Nov 26, John rated it it was ok. If you need to learn something practical about what is a pretty complex topic, this book is useless.

    If you need something to fight off the "conservatives" in the business world, this is your goto.

    [Ebook]^^ Remote Office Not Required Full Pages by Phoenix Woods - Issuu

    I've two main gripes with the book. The first is about the pacing and chapter lengths. Reading this you feel like you're being shown a second hand car in dodgy yard. You end up revisiting the nice things over and over, and move very quickly past any areas that have problems.

    The second is the reliance on a bunch of strawman arguments. The main takeaway I got was because most meetings in most companies suck and that caring about which hours bums are in seats instead of caring about results means remote is better.

    They're pretty separate issues - and trust me, I know from experience, meetings with remote staff can be just as terrible. Same with switching from clock-watching to being more result oriented - having the staff remote is a bit of a psychological hack to make the switch easier - but it doesn't address the issue directly.

    View all 7 comments. Nov 18, John rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a very tricky book to review. Let me note first that I work remotely as a technology leader at a Boston-based medical startup. I know remote work very well. I use every tool in this book. I've been remote since the beginning, and my managers and colleagues understand the dynamic, but it's still hard, and not something that is fully embraced in our work. I'm going to have to divide the readership up into categories: The reason is that you will be hungering for more patterns and stories regarding the nitty gritty of how remote work actually.

    For instance, the book says I paraphrase "use Skype". The book is not really for you. To be sure, you will still learn things, and the book confirms a number of things you have suspected but not really articulated.

    For instance, it is very good on the paradox that workers in two fairly different time zones frequently get more done collectively: One reason is that because of the time shift, the team can't interrupt itself with random meetings: You always get 3 or 4 hours to get the core work done. You really need to read this book. For you guys, it's five stars all the way. Don't listen to people like Marissa Mayer, who at Yahoo put the kibosh on remote work -- she is wrong they may very well have a problem with badly-managed remote work.

    With well-managed remote work, there are huge gains to be made in productivity and the happiness of your team, as well as the basic economics of your business. For instance: If you don't allow remote work, you are limited to the people in your geographic area; if you can handle remote work, then you can hire the very best in the whole world. The book provides a good deal of guidance. I think this is a five star book for you, too, because it's about time that you thought hard about your lack of planning and thought in this area.

    The good news is that there are great advantages to remote work. The bad news that it requires a lot of thinking to get it right.

    There are big contradictions in remote work. For instance, the authors advise that remote workers figure out a routine pp. Meanwhile, they note that "Routine has a tendency to numb your creativity" p. With freedom comes responsibility.

    The book is quite padded - there are illustrations that seem to be there only to boost the page count. I wouldn't waste my money on a printed version: Kindle all the way. Aside from the over-all argument, which is breezy but sound, I want to pick out a few specific points where I think there's some good detail: View 1 comment.

    REMOTE: Office Not Required

    May 14, Rod Hilton rated it liked it Shelves: This book was a little disappointing, not because it's bad but because it wasn't quite what I was looking for. The book advertises itself as a collection of solutions to problems people encounter when embracing remote work, but more than anything else the problem it solves is "how do I convince management to embrace remote work?

    A lot of it seems geared toward executives and manager This book was a little disappointing, not because it's bad but because it wasn't quite what I was looking for. A lot of it seems geared toward executives and managers, or giving lower-level employees ammunition and counterarguments for common objections. That's all well and good, but as someone who is already on-board with remote work and pretty experienced doing it for over 5 years, I don't personally need any convincing - I need help.

    Going remote poses unique challenges and difficulties, and I thought the book might help give me some practical solutions to issues I've had with remote work as someone who prefers it and wants to be more successful with it. There's a little of that in the book, but it's mostly meant to persuade. I decided to read the book because I'm joining a new team that is fully distributed and having some struggles, and I was hoping this book would help me help them - but that's not really what's in here.

    That said, since reading the book by total coincidence I've found myself involved in multiple conversations with people skeptical of remote work, and I used multiple arguments and examples I got directly from the book during the section of the book I felt like I wasn't getting much from, so maybe it's better than I give it credit for.

    If someone is on the fence about remote work, this book is great. If you want to go remote and you need help convincing your team, your manager, or your company executives, this book is great. If everyone is already on board with remote work and needs practical solutions to issues that arise, the book is I guess? It's mostly fine. Nov 10, Mouly rated it did not like it. I like 37 signals as a company. They are one of the successful virtual companies. So I had a lot of expectations when I bought the book the day it was launched.

    But the book was a big letdown. I felt chapters ended abruptly and switched directions unexpectedly. A later chapter, about team collaboration, recommends a four hour overlap I like 37 signals as a company. A later chapter, about team collaboration, recommends a four hour overlap between team-members.

    How can people from North America, Europe and Asia work at the same time without one of the burning midnight oil? This is a basic constraint of remote office that the book just glosses over. In the end the book frustrated me more than helping me. I agree with the authors that remote working will be more common in the future.

    There are some nuggets of wisdom sprinkled across the book. But you will have to endure reams of sloppy writing to find them. View 2 comments. Nov 15, Vitor Capela rated it it was ok. As a remote worker myself, I nodded my head frequently at the advantages and challenges presented, so the rating's not about a fundamental disagreement with the message or the intentions.

    Like the authors, I know from personal experience that commuting, facing a strict set of working hours, interruptions and living with the expectation of availability from others are some of the greatest dangers to work and creative work especially. I did, however, expect more than short chapters and sparse dat As a remote worker myself, I nodded my head frequently at the advantages and challenges presented, so the rating's not about a fundamental disagreement with the message or the intentions.

    I did, however, expect more than short chapters and sparse data points. Maybe it's the programmer in me misunderstanding the whole "business book" thing, but perhaps the arguments would hold more weight if they were more than anedoctal.

    This renders the whole thing as an account of what works for 37signals — a very small and relatively unknown company in the greater scheme of things. Maybe stronger data and clearer research could work better against gut reactions.

    If you want something to challenge your views with great insights, don't bother: Dec 14, Nikolay rated it really liked it. Thin, short-paragraphed, biased, opinionated, beautifully written and illustrated remote work manifesto and a sales pitch. Every copyrighter should be jealous. If you don't have much experience with remote working or you let your mind wander for a bit, the book is extremely convincing.

    If you look deeper, you may notice that they offer faux acknowledgements for all the drawbacks Thin, short-paragraphed, biased, opinionated, beautifully written and illustrated remote work manifesto and a sales pitch.

    If you look deeper, you may notice that they offer faux acknowledgements for all the drawbacks and unsuitability of remote working.

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    All problems seem to have very easy solutions in the book. In practice, it's a lot more complicated. The book is great remote work sales tool, just don't forget to think of all angles if you need to put it into practice. Oct 29, icarranna rated it liked it Shelves: I read this book in one sitting.

    I liked it, but I could not quite figure out the audience. As someone who has worked as a remote employee for over 7 years, a lot of the information was preaching to the choir - I get remote work, because I live it. If the book was written for managers who are looking to make a change, then I don't this book is strong or practical enough a better book would be Why Managing Sucks.

    If this book is written for non-managing employees, then they more than likely don I read this book in one sitting. If this book is written for non-managing employees, then they more than likely don't have the ability to change their work environment and all it will do is make them WANT to work remotely. It is kind of like one big manifesto on Remote work, written in a clear and organized way, but not very "practical. I will say that even as a remote employee, there were a few good ideas that I picked up on.

    Lines that I liked "Coming into the office just means people have to put on pants. There's no guarantee of productivity. So I got something out of it, even if a lot of the book was not "new" information for me. Jul 31, Derek rated it liked it Shelves: Jul 31, Rework was an amazing book that put into words how I feel about work.

    Remote was different. While I agree that remote work can be effective, I disagreed with several of the sections. First off, I work for Accenture, one of the companies interviewed and quoted in the book. The description of Accenture in the book in no way matches what happens in real life.

    Because they are required to be on-site, butt in seat, logging face ti Jul 31, Rework was an amazing book that put into words how I feel about work. Because they are required to be on-site, butt in seat, logging face time, at a client location. We're getting better, many people work from home on Fridays, and sometimes travel schedules allow workers to be at the client every other week.

    There is still a massive emphasis on face time and time in seat rather than completed work.

    The Accenture ergonomics program was not accurately depicted. Want an ergonomic setup? Get a doctor's note. Without that you don't get anything.

    Even with a note, the selection is very limited and, frankly, not very good. I downloadd my own monitor, monitor arm, ergonomic keyboard, etc. When Marissa Meyer got rid of the Yahoo work from home program I applauded her. I saw a similar program at a similar client, and it was a disaster. One person posted a Facebook photo of them on the beach with the caption "working from home". That person got very little done. Did the remote work program follow all the guidelines laid out in Remote?

    And I doubt Yahoo's did either. Big companies are not always made up of self-motivated and hard working people. The system can be abused, and often is. I think remote working has a bright future. I just don't think things are quite as binary as Remote makes them out to be.

    Feb 02, Natalie rated it it was amazing. I loved learning about how this company made it work. The no "jerks" allowed rule really resonates with me.

    REMOTE: Office Not Required

    Oct 27, Catarina Clemente rated it really liked it. Great book. A compreenhensive review of the pros and cons of remote work, addressing some of the miths about working out of traditional offices. The only thing I would point out is that it needs to be understood in a skilled work environment. While I believe that most people deserve the benefit of the doubt, I think the authors are sometimes a bit naive in their assessment of people's commitment ti their work.

    All in all a great read and a must for managers. A lot of us are already working remot Great book. A lot of us are already working remotely from our big distracting offices.

    Jan 05, Fib rated it really liked it. As a remote worker, I felt very connected with the stories in this book. TBH, I was already familar with most of the recommendations, because I have been working remotely for a year, but that's actually a good thing, because it means that we're all on the same channel and there's a common path to success for remote workers. There is no longer a reason for the daily roll call, of the need to be seen with your butt on your seat in the office.

    The technology to work remotely and to avoid the daily grind of commuting and meetings has finally come of age, and bestselling authors Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson are the masters of making it work at tech company 37signals. Remote working is the future - and it is rushing towards us. Remote- Office Not Required combines eye-opening ideas with entertaining narrative.

    It will convince you that working remotely increases productivity and innovation, and it will also teach you how to get it right - whether you are a manager, working solo or one of a team. Chapters include- 'Talent isn't bound by the hubs', 'It's the technology, stupid', 'When to type, when to talk', 'Stop managing the chairs' and 'The virtual water cooler'. Brilliantly simple and refreshingly illuminating this is a call to action to end the tyranny of being shackled to the office.

    General Format: Paperback Language: English Number Of Pages: Ebury Publishing Country of Publication: GB Dimensions cm: Help Centre. My Wishlist Sign In Join. Remote Office Not Required By: Jason Fried , David Heinemeier Hansson. Be the first to write a review. Add to Wishlist.